Anti-Cancer News: The New York Times on Feeding Cancer

anti-cancer dillThis week’s New York Times magazine features a story on a theme familiar to all of you readers of this anti-cancer blog : the metabolic approach to starving, or feeding, disease. It singles out insulin and a related hormone, Insulin Growth Factor-1, which we’ve talked about often.  And if glucose, glutamine and certain fatty acids drive cancer, as the metabolic scientists quoted in the article suggest, then what could be more important than phytonutrients that keep cancer cells from utilizing those fuels? That’s another theme we’ve been addressing.  Remember singing the praises of dill?  Continue reading

2016: What’s on and off your Anti-Cancer Platter?

anti-cancer dietary strategies

Chicken’s off the platter if your New Year’s resolutions include restricting methionine–a promising new strategy to fight cancer and forestall aging.

What’s the latest advice that scientists are dishing out for your anti-cancer diet?

  • off the platter: suspect proteins
  • on the platter: plant proteins, but which ones and how much?
  • on the platter: flavonoids

Read the backstory first to enhance tonight’s exchanges with loved ones.  Continue reading

Anti-Cancer Outrage: Let us Eat Cake?

Is this an anti-cancer diet joke?Ready for some anti-cancer nonsense? This weekend, the Quebec Breast Cancer Foundation is sponsoring– get this– the Montreal Cake Show!  Last time I checked the anti-cancer diet books, cake was definitely off the menu.  

In fact, the esteemed World Cancer Research Fund/ American Institute of Cancer Research panel of scientists just issued this proclamation: Continue reading

Anti-Cancer Strategies: Bring on the Leftover Carbs!

Leek and turnip soup

Want to sneak a few satisfying starches into your anti-cancer diet– say some hot, mushy sweet potatoes 

Here’s how:

 

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Anti-Cancer Strategies: Fats and Fasting, a Revolutionary Weapon for an Aggressive Enemy

anti-cancer strategies: ketogenic diets

Could coconut fat help turn the tide in the anti-cancer battle?

Update: Ketogenic diets may not offer the solution that scientists hoped for, but looking at how cancer cells burn fuel for energy is for sure generating insight into how cancer grows and spread. Since this article was published, some scientists have found that cancers can switch to feeding on ketones, which are generated by fat. They’ve also added some fatty acids to the list of nutrients that cancer cells may feed on. Palmitic acid, which is in coconut, may feed cancer, especially in  people with certain genetic profiles. The good news is that scientists have also identified phytonutrients that keep cancer cells from using fatty acids as fuels. Among them, luteolin–present in radicchio, thyme, sage, parsley, celery flakes and seeds–is key. 

Is the war on cancer now witnessing its own D-Day, a turning point in the anti-cancer fight that will change the world for good?

With the recent settlement of a major lawsuit among scientists over who owns the rights to new revolutionary approaches to managing cancer, all the experts in the field are presumably now free to talk openly—and what they’re talking about is a radical new view of the disease.

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Anti-Cancer Recipes: No Sugar, Lots of Spice and other Zesty Thoughts

Note: Writer-Producer Harriet Sugar Miller has been a health journalist and cancer survivor for almost two decades. In her past life (before children), she practiced law in NYC. 

Although Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month wraps today, the disease remains– and will always be the beast that roused this anti-cancer blog.

In the words of McGill University’s Dr. Gerald Wiviott, we all need a trigger to help us get off our bums (Canadian for “butts”) and make changes:  Inspiration, Motivation, Provocation and Support.   Continue reading

Anti-Cancer News: RIP Rice, even Brown Organic

anti cancer news RIP riceThe news this past week—that some rice and rice products are contaminated with arsenic—should spark a change in your anti-cancer eating habits.

Here’s the short version of the story: Continue reading