Anti-Cancer Recipes: Should you Cook Onions?

anti-cancer onion artNow that your anti-cancer kitchen is brimming with small red and yellow onions, the obvious question is: Should you cook them or eat them raw?

The short answer:  Continue reading

Anti-Cancer Recipes: How to Handle Garlic, Part 1

anti cancer properties of garlicYearning to know the best ways of preserving garlic’s anti-cancer properties? Continue reading

Anti-Cancer Recipes: Should you Cook Cabbage?

anti cancer cabbage tipsNovember 2013 update: Please read the groundbreaking news about crucifers! Scientists have recently discovered that lightly steamed cabbage has more anti-cancer compounds than raw cabbage (with one exception:  qing gin cai is best raw)–and that you can cook any cabbage any way you want as long as you eat a little raw crucifer in the same meal. Radish, mustard, watercress, wasabi–any raw crucifer will do.     

Most people will tell you to eat cabbage for its anti-cancer compounds, but they don’t explain that how you prepare it is key. If you want to get the anti-cancer benefits from cabbage, then heed this advice: Continue reading

Anti-Cancer Recipes: No Sugar, Lots of Spice and other Zesty Thoughts

Note: Writer-Producer Harriet Sugar Miller has been a health journalist and cancer survivor for almost two decades. In her past life (before children), she practiced law in NYC. 

Although Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month wraps today, the disease remains– and will always be the beast that roused this anti-cancer blog.

In the words of McGill University’s Dr. Gerald Wiviott, we all need a trigger to help us get off our bums (Canadian for “butts”) and make changes:  Inspiration, Motivation, Provocation and Support.   Continue reading

Anti Cancer Shopping Tips: What’s going in your Tomato Sauce?

anti cancer tomatoes

2014 update: Add to the BPA free list: Jovial organic tomatoes, Hunt’s plain canned tomatoes (but not any of their other tomato products.) 

Today you’re making tomato sauce. Good choice. Tomatoes are prized for their lycopene, the pigment that turns them red and is associated with anti-cancer activity. Continue reading

Anti-Cancer Foods: Crucifer Cooking Tips, Take Two

kale to fight cancer

What to do–and NOT to do– with this bounty of kale?

November 2013 update: Please read the groundbreaking news about crucifers!

Cruciferous veggies may seem tough on the outside, but as we talked about in the first post on these anti-cancer wonders, they’re highly sensitive to boot. If you don’t handle them properly, their magic powers could literally evaporate.   

University of Warwick scientist Dr. Paul Thornalley explains: Crucifers contain compounds called glucosinolates that, when mixed with an enzyme (myrosinase), get converted to another compound (isothiocyanates )with high cancer prevention activity. Talk about a mouthful…   Continue reading